Highland Gallery hosts Visual Art Faculty Exhibit

 

The Highland Gallery will feature work by current HCC Visual Arts faculty members beginning with a reception on Oct. 25, ending on Dec. 7 at the Ferguson Fine Arts Center at Highland Community College, 2998 W. Pearl City Rd., Freeport, Ill.

 

The annual event displays work by faculty art available for contemplation, stimulation, and discussion as a featured exhibit for the Fall 2018 semester. The opening reception is from 4:30 to 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25 at the Highland Gallery. Refreshments will be served.

 

“The exhibit illuminates images and concerns created by HCC Visual Arts faculty,” explains Highland Gallery Director Robert Apolloni. “This is always a popular exhibit as it presents our art instructors as professional exhibiting artists, as opposed to their more familiar role as visual art instructors.”

 

The exhibit features the work of the following artists:

 

  • Robert Apolloni: Mixed media paintings based on the human form
  • Sam Tucibat: Computer-assisted photographs

 

The exhibit is free and open to the public. The Highland Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information about the gallery or Highland’s Visual Arts program, contact Robert Apolloni at 815-599-3479 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..



THE ETERNAL INDIAN

• More commonly known as the Black Hawk Statue, the Eternal Indian was constructed by Lorado Taft at his Eagle’s Nest artists’ colony in 1910.

• Weather and the passing of a century have weakened the statue, and now it must be repaired or it could be lost forever.

• State funds available to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources are not enough to repair the statue.

• The Illinois Conservation Foundation and local community volunteers are raising private funding to cover the final costs of restoring this piece of American art history.

 

HISTORIC CONSTRUCTION

• The Eternal Indian was constructed by pouring concrete into forms.

• Built in frigid December temperatures, it required complex heating and pouring techniques never before tried in 1910.

• Lorado Taft brought Chicago Art Institute sculptor John Prasuhn in to help develop these new techniques.

• Local heavy equipment manufacturer E. D. Etnyre also contributed time, equipment and materials.

• One hundred years later, Etnyre’s company is once again contributing to efforts to preserve this historic statue.

 

COMMUNITY VALUE

• The Eternal Indian is a treasured landmark to the Oregon, Illinois community.

• Lorado built it to pay homage to the Native American heritage of the Rock River Valley.

• Thousands of students and art enthusiasts visit Lowden State Park every year to see the statue.

• Local residents anxiously await the restoration and return of the “Black Hawk” statue.

 

THE DAMAGE

• The statue has been damaged by snow, ice and even lightning.

• It has stood for 100 years, so wear and tear is inevitable.

• Landmarks Illinois classified it as one of the most endangered historic landmarks in the state.

• The state legislature made a $350,000 matching grant to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources — however, we now need to raise $225,000 in private money to match.

• The Illinois Conservation Foundation and local community

volunteers need your help to make it to our goal.

 

THE RESTORATION

• Planning has been completed. A contract to begin restoration is

ready once all funds are secured.

• Chicago-based engineering firm Simpson, Gumpertz and Hager is

contributing their expertise in overseeing the reconstruction.

• Quality Restorations, Inc. will complete the restoration, in some

cases using the original molds Taft and Prasuhn created together.

• On July 18, the Etnyre family foundation donated $100,000 in

addition to the $25,000 that Oregon Together has already raised.

• Local foundations have pledged another $55,000.

• All that stands in the way of saving the Eternal Indian is $35,000.

 

HOW YOU CAN HELP

The Illinois Conservation Foundation cannot save this iconic piece of art without your generosity and support. Your donations directly contribute to the preservation of the Eternal Indian. By sharing this story, you also can give others the opportunity to help us save this treasured landmark of the Rock River Valley. Will you help us protect it?

For more information or to make a donation--www.ilcf.org

 

Highland Community College Art Exhibit

Highland Gallery hosts Visual Art Faculty Exhibit   The Highland Gallery will feature work by current HCC Visual Arts faculty members beginning with a reception on Oct. 25, ending on Dec. 7...

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The Eternal Indian History

THE ETERNAL INDIAN • More commonly known as the Black Hawk Statue, the Eternal Indian was constructed by Lorado Taft at his Eagle’s Nest artists’ colony in 1910. • Weather and the...

Read more